*Contains a Pirate Princess and Dissertation Beasties*

 

There’s this thing called a D-I-S-S-E-R-T-A-T-I-O-N in my life right now. (Shhh, we don’t say its name. Might wake the beast.) I’m nearly done, but it’s consumed most of my days for the last couple months, making it impossible to do any writing that isn’t academic.

Did I say impossible?

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Interview with Travis Peck

Travis Peck is a fellow Self-Published Fantasy Blog Off author; our books are being read by the same reviewer/blogger. I thought it’d be fun to reach out and shine some light on Travis, his writing, and his book, RAVINOR, which you can find on Amazon. (Read about the SPFBO here.)IMG_6591

So, first we need to exchange the secret History major handshake. Did you have a specific area of study?

Shh! Don’t give them any hints! We will exchange the rest of the ritualized greeting via our Enigma machines…

My thesis focused on medieval Japan, but I really find most time periods and world regions to be very interesting: Ancient Rome, the Golden Horde, Tsarist Russia, the World Wars, to name a few of my favorites.

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Name: [fill in the blank]

Someone recently asked me how I go about naming my characters, whether I find it difficult, whether the name or the personality comes first, whether I sacrifice weekly or quarterly to the name gods,* you get the idea.

I think my answer to this has shifted over time. I used to agonize over a character’s name for days, weeks, eternally. I really felt that the right name mattered, that it would help define and draw out the character. But I couldn’t bear to put a placeholder in while I waited for the right name to ride in on its unicorn. Naturally, this put a serious damper on progress.

I still feel that names are vital. But my naming experiences during the drafting of The Song of the Ash Tree were vastly different from everything that had come before.

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My Characters Don’t Talk to Me–And I’m Okay With That

“My character told me he certainly did not want to go on a date with his intended love interest.”**

“My protagonist decided she had a fear of space-walking zombie rabbits, despite the fact that she single-handedly eradicated the emperor’s face-eating hellhounds.”**

“My supposedly loyal warrior waltzed into the scene and said, in no uncertain terms, that he would, in fact, betray his oath–for the right price.”**

** These are statements invented by yours truly, not pulled from anyone else’s blog, tweet, or brain.

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